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Texas official resigns after a video emerges of her yelling at a confused black voter

Earlier today, an election supervisor from Williamson County, Texas was forced to step down after a video emerged of her yelling at a black voter who was confused about her voting location.

The video was captured on tape by a third party who was present at the confrontation on Friday afternoon. Lila Guzman is seen telling repeatedly telling the voter to leave the voting station:

“Get out. Get out. Get out. You are rude. You are not following the law. Go. Go.”

According to KVUE news, the voter who captured the footage said that she began to record the incident as Guzman started to raise her voice at the black voter.

“I was like, ‘This is getting out of hand.’ So, I began to record. She did tell her she couldn’t vote there, but she didn’t say where in Travis, the lady did have an accent. She could’ve been new to the country. I don’t know, but she needed some help.”

As the video continues, Guzman keeps on threatening to call the police on the voter (whose identity hasn’t been revealed) didn’t leave, claiming they would arrive to physically remove her from the building. The voter reportedly left the building before law enforcement had arrived.

In recent elections, there have been numerous claims of white elections administrators trying to prevent black minority voters from casting their ballots. Since the voter turned away was a woman of colour, many might attribute Guzman’s harsh treatment to systematic racial profiling.

Nonetheless, Williamson County’s top officials were quick to dispel this notion, fully condemning Guzman’s actions.

Williamson County Elections Administrator Chris Davis said that this Guzman’s behaviour was completely unwarranted and is not reflective of the training they receive for their occupation.

“We always train them and advise them to maintain control of the situation politely and answer voter’s questions and give voter options so situations like these don’t escalate.”

David claimed that the black voter had already been turned away by poll workers in Travis County before she arrived at the Williamson County polling station. Although the voter was registered in Williamson County, she lived in Travis County. According to the proper procedure she should have been sent to Travis County Elections Divisions to cast her ballot.

“We always train them and advise them to maintain control of the situation politely and answer voter’s questions and give voter options so situations like these don’t escalate.”

Apparently, Guzman felt no regret about her decision, and only resigned from her position as election supervisor because she felt the Davis police didn’t back her up when she called the police. However, she did say she tired and that she could have handled the situation better than she did.

However, Davis didn’t excuse Guzman’s behaviour:

“It was the end of the day, and we were seeing steady turnout across all sites, but again, no excuse. It’s our job to get voters answers and help them vote, either at our site or the site where they need to vote.”

Since she resigned, Guzman will not be working on election day.